You need to upgrade your Flash Player
Southwest Asia > Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan - a nation with a majority-Turkic and majority-Muslim population - was briefly independent from 1918 to 1920; it regained its independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

There are an estimated 24 to 33 million Azerbaijanis in the world, but census figures are difficult to verify. The vast majority live in Azerbaijan and Iranian Azerbaijan. Between 16 and 23 million Azeris live in Iran, mainly in the northwestern provinces. Approximately 7.6 million Azeris are found in the Republic of Azerbaijan. A diaspora, possibly numbering in the millions, is found in neighboring countries and around the world. There are sizable communities in Turkey, Georgia, Russia, UK, USA, Canada, Germany and other countries. In Russia, Azeris are listed among the indigenous small-numbered people of Dagestan Russia. While population estimates in Azerbaijan are considered reliable due to regular censuses taken, the figures for Iran remain questionable. Since the early twentieth century, successive Iranian governments have avoided publishing statistics on ethnic groups. Unofficial population estimates of Azeris in Iran range from 20–24%. However, many Iran scholars claim that Azeris may comprise as much as one third of Iran's population.

Share on
Azerbaijan
by Rena Effendi

Tongal (traditional Novruz fire) on the streets of Mahalla

more...
Novruz in Baku
by Ismail Safarali

It is difficult to imagine that once in the history of our country, Novruz was a forbidden holiday. Banned in Azerbaijan for over seventy years by the Soviet authorities, Novruz was preserved in its full glory in a family home. I remember in our small neighborhood of Yuxari Mahalla, my brother and I exchanged sweets and small presents with the kids from the next block, all under the cover of night.

more...
Azerbaijan
by Rena Effendi

Novruz Bayram in the Old City

more...
Rena Effendi

Born in 1977 in Baku, Azerbaijan, Rena Effendi has been photographing since 2001. From the outset, Effendi has focused her documentary work on the oil industry’s effects on people’s lives in her own country. As a result, she followed a 1,700 km oil pipeline through Georgia and Turkey, collecting stories along the way. This work of six years was published in 2009 in her first book “Pipe Dreams: A Chronicle of Lives along the Pipeline”.

more...